Armando Moritz-Chapelliquen
Director of Capacity Building

Armando.C@anhd.org

p:

212-747-1117, ext. 19

Armando Moritz-Chapelliquen is the Director of Capacity Building. He leads our Center for Community Leadership and coordinates with staff to intentionally build the skills and power of organizers, advocates, and the movement as a whole. Beyond a commitment to our members and coalitions, Armando enjoys spending time with his wife, refining his practice of the martial arts, writing poetry, and hanging out with his cat Coltrane. 

Armando's Blogs

Blog
January 30, 2018
New York is experiencing growing pains. It’s quickly changing and neighborhoods with strong identities and histories are melding into the same glass-towered landscape that reigns throughout the City, rendering them unrecognizable.
Blog
December 18, 2017
Today, the Industrial Jobs Coalition joined with City Council members to celebrate the upcoming passage of zoning protections for the City's 21 Industrial Business Zones (IBZs). These protections, meant to clamp down on competing non-industrial uses and ensure space for good-paying jobs, create the foundation for broader zoning reforms.
Blog
November 2, 2017
Almost two years to the day since Mayor de Blasio announced his historic Industrial Action Plan, the City seems to be stepping back from their plan. Yesterday, the City Planning Commission voted on a proposal to mix manufacturing and self-storage in core industrial areas
Blog
October 31, 2017
Small businesses along the Fulton Street commercial corridor in Brooklyn came out in force last week to urge City attention at resolving challenges to running their businesses. The Cypress Hills Business Partners Merchant Association and local business owners highlighted the heavy fines associated with awning violations, which has led some shopkeepers to face fines of as much as $20,000.
Blog
September 13, 2017
The recently reported business idea for Bodega (hereafter referred to as Brodega), a glorified vending machine aiming to replace the venerable New York institution, is not a bodega at all; it’s an engine for displacing hardworking business owners.

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