Land Use Justice

About

New York City’s land use and zoning regulations are key levers in the development and preservation of our city’s communities. Unfortunately, however, the needs and interests of low- and moderate-income New Yorkers, people of color, immigrants, and other marginalized populations are not often represented or considered in how our land is used, what gets built where, what gets preserved, and who has rights and access to space.

Why This Matters

Land use justice is key to creating thriving communities, as it ensures that all residents are reshaping the various areas of our neighborhoods. Without proper representation from, or the inclusion of low- and moderate-income New Yorkers, people of color, immigrants, and other marginalized populations, the City ends up making decisions on land use that exacerbate inequality, by privileging capital over community.

What We're Doing

ANHD is building the power of marginalized communities to have control over the land use decisions that shape their neighborhoods and promote equity.

To ensure land use policies and investments are driven by our city’s community needs, we provide both individual and group-based rezoning technical assistance to neighborhoods who are facing land use and zoning changes. Additionally, we provide research and advocacy on land use opportunities that promote public good.

Check out the associated projects below for more information on how we are fighting for land use justice.

Related Resources

Sharing insights to help transform industrial buildings and space into places where urban manufacturing thrives and communities can grow
How Our Planning Priorities Got Us to COVID-19 Disparate Impacts
ANHD’s Map of COVID-19 and Hospital Closures Shows that the Majority Fell in Lower-Income Communities of Color that Bear the Brunt of the Coronavirus Crisis Today
While All New Yorkers Are Impacted By Covid-19, We Must Recognize & Swiftly Address the Needs Of New York’s Most Vulnerable & At Risk Communities
In my comments today I want to echo the demand of neighborhood residents and stakeholders in stating that the Bushwick Community Plan’s zoning proposal must be studied as an alternative in the EIS.
In offering my testimony today I want to echo the vital concerns raised by community members asking who this rezoning will actually serve.
The CEQR methodology incorrectly assumes that many populations, including rent stabilized tenants, face no risk of displacement.
ANHD echos the vital concerns raised by community members asking who this rezoning will actually serve and how to fix it.
ANHD and the Industrial Jobs Coalition oppose the proposed spot rezonings of 1010 and 1050 Pacific Street.

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